2 Hannahstown Hill, Belfast BT170LT  +44 (0) 2890 611916
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Conference Clubs

 

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Wednesday

The Cloth Ear

35-39 Waring Street,
Belfast,
County Antrim,
BT1 2DY


 

The Cloth Ear is The Merchant Hotel’s comfortable public bar. The warm and welcoming interior provides the ideal environment to relax and enjoy yourself in style. Combining both modern and traditional design features with a healthy dose of eccentric touches – the many unique items of vintage and antique clothing, the wooden moose and deer heads and the classic 1930’s – 1950’s sheet music that adorns the walls.

The food in The Cloth Ear is intrinsically comforting. Inspired by homemade favourites, it is nostalgic yet fresh and creative, making use of the best locally sourced seasonal produce. A selection of daily specials is also a feature of The Cloth Ear dining experience, allowing the chefs to really capitalise on the best and freshest seasonal ingredients.

 

 

Thursday

The National

62 High St
Belfast,
County Antrim,
BT1 2BE


 
Behind the elegant listed facade of the old National Bank lies an intentionally unfinished industrial interior of exposed brick, steel girders and concrete floor. Welcome to Belfast’s latest watering hole where diners and drinkers congregate to parade their cool credentials.

 

 

Friday

The Dirty Onion

3 Hill Street,
Belfast,
County Antrim,
BT1 2LA


 
The Dirty Onion welcomes you to one of Belfast’s oldest buildings reintroduced as a traditional public house with a modern twist. We offer live traditional music seven nights and two afternoons a week! We are also home to Yardbird free range chicken rotisserie restaurant.

This site was originally constructed around the 1750’s as a warehouse and first used as a spirits bonded warehouse in 1921. The bond, known as STACK “N” (The N refers to North, as in the north side of Waring Street, number 42) and was operated by Edward Dillon Bonders until the company moved to larger premises in 1991.

Stack “N” was used to store Jameson in barrels and crates, and during this period tens of thousands of bottles of Jameson passed through these doors.

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